The Evangelical Universalist Forum

Lutheranism


#1

I’ve just recently begun learning about Lutheranism. Would it be fair to say that out of all Protestant denominations it’s the most similar to Catholicism? Obviously there’s no Pope or Magesterium, but Lutheranism seems a lot closer to Catholicism than say, Southern Baptist, Methodism, or Pentecostalism.


#2

No. I would say Anglicanism is - especially with the Anglo-Catholic tradition. And probably Lutheranism second.


#3

I agree with Randy


#4

But don’t take our word for it. See what folks are saying regarding it, at the Catholic forum thread - at Catholic Answers:

Closest Denominations?

Here is a sample comment:


#5

I wasn’t taking your word for it. But agreed because it’s been my experience. I haven’t studied all denominations though. So you do have a point somewhat.


#6

Actually, St. Michael, I was referring to qaz. I guess I should of quoted him. I did use the word our - in my reply.


#7

oops! Sorry buddy. :smiley:


#8

Actually, Martin Luther is a huge part of reformed theology. Thus the study of Lutheranism, as you say, is a great study. The reform tradition would not have happened without Martin Luther, (I tend to think) and is so cool. You might read, ‘Bondage of the will.’ He was in a fight, somewhat like those who are on this site are in a fight, (about universal reconciliation and other topics) but the ideas are moving ahead and progressing. The Lutherans, (as well as most every other denomination) are trying to stifle the advancement of ideas IMHO. Luther had a bit of a flaw in his theology, but it took me a bit of time and study to realize it. I am a total fan Of Martin Luther, but I also realize, we need to take what he has done and move forward.

I hope this makes some sense.

Chad :smiley:


#9

I think we need to study first, the way of peace and diplomacy. Like Rupus T Firefly does. :exclamation: :laughing:

or

youtube.com/watch?v=m9Wh66FXZJQ


#10

As I see it, Lutheranism may look similar to Catholicism in the matter of liturgy. But doctrinally, it is not so close.


#11

Generally agreed with a caveat: “High church” Anglicans tend to protest being called Protestants. They prefer to be called “Anglicans” or “Catholics” or “Anglo-Catholics”. So Lutherans are either first or second on the list, depending on whether or not one considers Anglicanism a form of Protestantism.

A relatively recent convert to Orthodoxy at our parish has a friend who is hard-core Lutheran (Wisconsin Evangelican Lutheran Synod, to be exact). He refers to himself as a “WELS Lutheran” or as a “Protestant”. He takes great exception to anyone other than a hard-core Lutheran calling himself a Protestant. He says that only Lutherans are Protestants, while all other so-called Protestants are mentally-confused heretics who are most certainly not Protestants.


#12

The Protestant Site Got Questions, has a good article defining High Church worship style. Wiki does a good job, of defining the Anglo-Catholic position:

The expressions Anglo-Catholic, Anglican Catholic, and Catholic Anglican describe people, beliefs, and practices within Anglicanism which emphasize the Catholic heritage and identity of the various Anglican churches, rather than the churches’ Reformed heritage.
" Present-day “traditionalist” Anglo-Catholics seek to maintain tradition and to keep Anglican doctrine in line with that of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. They often ally themselves with Evangelicals to defend traditional teachings on sexual morality."
"In agreement with the Eastern Orthodox Church and Oriental Orthodox Churches, Anglo-Catholics — along with Old-Catholics and Lutherans — generally appeal to the “canon” (or rule) of St Vincent of Lerins: ’

"

Having said this, I call myself Anglo-Orthodox - rather than Anglo-Catholic, I find more common ground between Anglicanism and Eastern Orthodoxy. This is reflected in the article “Anglo-Orthodoxy”: Why some Episcopalians are turning to Eastern Orthodoxy for spiritual enlightenment by William DiPuccio, Ph.D at Anglo-Orthodoxy.


#13

Geoffrey, that’s fascinating. Why doesn’t your friend’s friend consider Southern Baptists, Methodists, Pentecostals etc protestant?


#14

It is for historical reasons. I do not remember the exact historical events, but I think it has to do with Lutherans in 1529 issuing a protest, resulting in them being referred to as Protestants. (In 1529, of course, John Calvin and King Henry VIII were still Roman Catholics.) This friend of a friend, then, applies the term “Protestant” only to those who share the faith of the original Protestants of 1529 (i. e., hard-core Lutherans). All other “Protestants” are thus misnamed, and are instead a chaos of heretics. Roman Catholics are part of the system of the Antichrist. Eastern Orthodoxy isn’t really on his radar, in spite of his friend converting to Orthodoxy.


#15

Geoffrey, I wonder if some non-Lutheran protestants feel that Luther didn’t go far enough… That Lutheranism is just “diet Catholicism”.


#16

Me thinks you need to define " “diet Catholicism” :exclamation: :laughing:

I’m trying to open a can of dehydrated water - just add water :exclamation: :laughing:


#17

Meaning Lutheranism retained too much from Catholicism.


#18

I know so for a fact. I’ve seen and heard a number of them say as much.


#19

Oh Boy… So you all are so righteous that without Luther’s move away from the very religion he loved, that we would actually be talking about the things we are talking about today… Shame on both of you… He was a earth shaker. You ought to be praising the mans stance. He might not have had everything exact, but you need to check yourself at the theological/historical door. :angry:


#20

:question:

What did I say in this thread against Luther?