My Premonitions as the "Word of Knowledge" Gift


#1

I anticipate starting a thread on speaking in tongues and Spirit baptism. But I feel a need to liven things up on this site; so instead, I will start a thread on my psychic experiences that arose from my glossolalia experience. If marijuana is a gateway drug to hard drugs, speaking in tongues seems to be a gateway gift to other spiritual gifts. My experience of speaking in tongues at age 16 was by far the highlight of my life. I will describe that experience in a future thread on Spirit baptism, but for now, let me just say that my tongues experience immediately led to my exercise of “the word of knowledge” (1 Cor 12:8). Here are my first 3 resulting premonitions:

(1) My tongues experience was so electrifying that it transformed my mind from a source of academic mediocrity to an awareness that I would be acknowledged as the high school senior with the highest GPA in my province. A few years ago, my psychiatrist cousin reminded me that I had told him I would achieve this goal. When the premier of my province announced this achievement at my high school commencement, it was one of my most thrilling experiences not because of the ego gratification, but because it proved that my Spirit baptism had truly placed me in the center of God’s will.

But “the word of knowledge” is a spiritual gift that can be part of a learning curve and its application is not always easy to grasp. Consider my next 2 premonitions:

(2) At age 19, I was a Winnipeg college student. About 5 years my senior, my friend Dallas was the leader of our church youth group of about 150. I had just been Best Man at his wedding and was now invited to the newlyweds’ post-Christmas dinner. After eating, we played table tennis in their basement. Dallas mentioned that he was going deer hunting in northern Manitoba the next day and I instantly felt a sense of dread. It seemed as if I saw his skeleton and was certain that he would be killed in an accident if he went on this trip. Horrified, I felt compelled to share my premonition with him. He was offended and blamed my so-called premonition on my anti-huntng views. I had no such views, though I’ve never gone hunting myself. What could I do? I had no evidence beyond my certainty. I guess I hoped God would confirm my premonition to Dallas.

A few days later, we had a New Year’s Eve service at our church. What happened when I arrived at the church was straight out of a horror movie. 3 young girls in our youth group approached me, giggling, and said. “You do know that Dallas was killed yesterday in a hunting accident. He was riding a snowmobile with his gun leaning beside him and hit a bump, which caused his rifle to discharge into his shoulder. He bled to death before his hunting buddies got him to a doctor.” Thr girls giggled and one said to the other, “Wow, I guess we sure ruined his day!” It was as if Hell was taunting me for my friendship with Dallas. What was so funny about their youth leader’s death? I charitably assumed that theirs was just a nervous laughter. I later obsessed over what this tragedy meant. Why was I given this premonition if it would be useless to prevent his death? Was his death predestined fate?

(3) In my senior year at Princeton Seminary, I was about to return home for Christmas vacation. My friend Ted had just been accepted in the D. Phil. program in New Testament at Cambridge U. and I also wanted to apply to that doctoral program. So I went to Ted’s dorm room and asked if I could borrow his Cambridge catalogue. As I did, I suddenly “saw” his skeleton and knew that his death was imminent. But what could I do? I didn’t know how he would die. So I tried to put this knowledge out of my mind and flew home for Christmas. When I returned, I learned from Ted’s friend Ken that Ted had been killed in a car accident. Ken was driving him home to Ohio, when Ken’s car slipped on an icy freeway onramp and the car crashed into a pole, killing Ted and breaking Ken’s arm.

I had tried to suppress my premonition. In retrospect, I wondered if God alerted me to Dallas’s and Ted’s fate because He wanted me to intercede for their protection. These premonitions kept coming and were never wrong! Stay tuned for more accounts.

After this experience, my first exercise of “the world of knowledge” was the inner knowing that my future career would be aided by being honored for the highest GPA in my province in my senior year… A few years ago, my psychiatrist cousin reminded me that I had told him I would achieve this goal. What makes this revelation such a gift is the fact that I had previously not done particularly well in high school. When the premier of my province announced this achievement at my high school commencement, it was one of my most thrilling experiences not because of the ego gratification, but because it proved that my Spirit baptism had truly placed me in the center of God’s will.
But “the word of knowledge” is a spiritual gift that can be part of a learning curve and its application is not always easy to grasp. Consider these 2 examples:
(1) At age 19, I was a Winnipeg college student. About 5 years my senior, my friend Dallas was the leader of our church youth group of about 150. I had just been Best Man at his wedding and was now invited to the newlyweds post-Christmas dinner. After eating, we played table tennis in their basement. Dallas mentioned that he was going deer hunting in northern Manitoba the next day and I instantly felt a sense of dread. It seemed as if I saw his skeleton and was certain that he would be killed in an accident if he went on this trip. Horrified, I felt compelled to share my premonition with him. He was offended and blamed my so-called premonition on my anti-huntng views. I had no such views, though I’ve never gone hunting myself. What could I do? I had no evidence beyond my certainty. I guess I hoped God would confirm my premonition to Dallas.

A few days later, we had a New Year’s Eve service at our church. What happened when I arrived at the church was straight out of a horror movie. 3 young girls in our youth group approached me, giggling, and said. You do know that Dallas was killed yesterday in a hunting accident. He was riding a snowmobile with his gun leaning beside him and hit a bump, which caused his rifle to discharge into his shoulder. He bled to death before his hunting buddies got him to a doctor. Thr girls giggled and one said to the other, “Wow, I guess we sure ruined his day!” It was as if Hell was taunting me for my friendship with Dallas. What was so funny about their youth leader’s death? I charitably assumed that their was just a nervous laughter. I later obsessed over what this tragedy meant. Why was I given this premonition if it would be useless to prevent his death? And was his death predestined fate?

(2) In my senior year at Princeton Seminary, I was about to return home for Christmas vacation. My friend Ted had just been accepted in the D. Phil. program in New Testament at Cambridge U. and I also wanted to apply to that doctoral program. So I went to Ted’s dorm room and asked if I could borrow his Cambridge catalogue. As I did, I suddenly “saw” his skeleton and knew that his death was imminent. But what could I do? I didn’t know how he would die. So I tried to put this knowledge out of my mind and flew home for Christmas. When I returned, I learned from Ted’s friend Ken that Ted had been killed in a car accident. Ken was driving him home to Ohio, when Ken’s car slipped on an icy freeway onramp and the car crashed into a pole, killing Ted and breaking Ken’s arm.

I had tried to suppress my premonition. In retrospect, I wondered if God alerted me to Dallas’s and Ken’s fate because He wanted me to intercede for their protection.


#2

Well, I can relate to what you say.

  • My Protestant mom - now deceased at 92.5 years old - was born with a gift of prophesy.

  • I hung around for years, with the healing mass and services…of Roman Catholic priest Father A. Who has the gift of healing and hearing the voice of God.

Nice sharing And very excellent schools. My Greek Orthodox friend Dora, received her PhD in Biblical Archaeology - from Oxford at 26. One of her sons, is a tenured professor at Harvard. And one of the world’s foremost authorities on genetic modeling. I know where you are coming from.

Perhaps a song, to emphasize the theme - of the thread?


#3

Hanukkah-Menorah
.
The Hanukkah menorah has nine branches, eight to remember the eight days of
Hanukkah, and the center one being the Shamash branch which holds the candle used to light the other candles, which is usually either higher or separate from the other eight branches.

Pastor Joseph Prince of Singapore, who frequently promotes praying in Tongues, has conjectured a symbolic correspondence between the nine spiritual gifts listed in 1 Corinthians 12:8-10—

  1. Word of wisdom
  2. Word of knowledge
  3. Faith
  4. Gifts of healings
  5. Miracles
  6. Prophecy
  7. Distinguishing between spirits
  8. Tongues
  9. Interpretation of tongues

–and the nine candles of the Hanukkah menorah, with Tongues corresponding to the Shamash candle. That is to say, he suggests that Tongues is the foundational gift which ignites all the others.


#4

(3) My next premonition at seminary came in the form of a nightmare in which my life was threatened and I pleaded with God for mercy. The next day, I drove to the Newark College of Engineering, where I was doing field work as a chaplain assistant. As I was driving home in the dark on a freeway, my motor suddenly died and my car slowed to a stop. I was fortunate to walk off the freeway through the heavy traffic and my car was totaled by another car shortly thereafter. I called 2 friends, Mike and Peter, from my dorm and they came and picked me up. Both of them said they too had experienced a nightmare the night before. At least in this case, the premonition seems intended to alert me to my personal danger and to induce me to pray for God’s protection. The precognitive nightmares of my 2 friends may have prepared their hearts to come to my rescue.

(4) A subsequent premonition involved a woman who read auras. I didn’t believe in aura reading; so I dismissed her claim that I would soon overreact to a disastrous experience. At the time I was renting a nice garage apartment. I had just bought a Toyota in Colorado Springs (while visiting my brother) and had driven it back to western New York. I suddenly had a premonition of a threat to my new car. I asked my landlord if I could park it in his driveway, but he refused. The next day, I was watching late night TV, when I heard a loud crash. A drunken 19-year-old girl had crashed into my car parked on the street and totaled it. The aura reader was right: I did overreact, partly because of my anticipation that something like this was about to happen. I later asked myself if my premonition was intended to prepare me to embrace this mishap in the right spirit.


#5

(5) My next premonition was very edifying. I had just completed a tiring year of college teaching and was eager for a vacation. But that Friday I gradually became obsessed with the conviction that a death was about to occur that would or should affect my vacation decision. The more I tried to put it out of my mind, the stronger it became until I began to shudder at the fear that the premonition involved the death of close family member.

On Monday, I was determined to forget about this and rushed to my front door to eat breakfast at a favorite restaurant. But as I reached the door, an apparently audible voice shouted, “Sit down! You are about to hear about the death!” Stunned, I sat down on the couch by the door, and immediately my phone rang! I was Dr. W. Whelan, the chair of the graduate theology MA program.

She explained the Cassian Corcoran, a visiting Franciscan New Testament professor, had failed to show up for his graduate school class on Pauline theology. Someone had gone to his room to find out why and it was eventually learned that he had died in his sleep of a diabetic coma. She explained that I was the only professor around trained to teach that course with no notice and pleaded with me to take on this assignment. By giving me a premonition of this death, God had made it clear to me that He wanted me to fill in the gap and I gladly taught that course and had a rewarding relationship with those students.


#6

(6) When I was a Theology professor, I was playing bridge with 3 other professors, including Paul, the Dean of the School of Education. Suddenly, in the midst of the laughter and irreverent talk, I received a “word of knowledge” and announced to Paul: “Ellie has been contacted by Joe and is wondering if the experience is real. Tell her I can assure her that it is.” Ellie and Joe were married and were both professors in the School of Education, but Joe had recently died of cancer. After our game, Paul called Ellie and, sure enough, she had just recently received a waking vision of Joe who proceeded to converse and reassure her and she was wondering if this was too good to be true. So my word of knowledge was a source of reassurance for her.