Libera Me Domine! (Row! Row! Fight The Powah!)


#1

(Note: I originally put this, this morning when I started writing it up, under Chat About Anything. But it kind of turned into a devotional sermon. :blush: :ugeek: :mrgreen: So I’ve moved it here, and left a shadow link behind in the other category. I’ll be glad to move it somewhere else on mod/admin suggestion.)

I’m a big fan of anime (and related things), and I think it’s amusing and sometimes inspirational (if inadvertently so) when they pick up Christian content to use as background color.

Today’s example is Tengen Toppen Gurren Lagann. This is a crazy-awesome Japanese super-robot anime, expressly designed by its creators (the production house Gainax) to be the ultimate super-robot show. It’s a bit of a parody in a way, but a seriously affectionate one to the genre.

I don’t want to give away too much of the plot, since part of the appeal of the show is how far the characters manage to go in the space of a single-season show. Suffice to say, as entertaining as it may be in other ways, it isn’t Christian in underlying cosmology. (If anything it’s an evolutionary religion-of-man kind of thing. But it’s as goodhearted as it can be about that. :slight_smile: )

That didn’t stop the producers from incorporating a VERY Christian Latin oratorio, combined with a Japanglish rap (Japanese rappers trying very hard to sound like black English rappers :wink: ), as important background music for some of the climactic action. Instead of ominous Latin chanting, it’s awesome Latin chanting. :mrgreen: But singing, not chanting.

The song is designed in its Latin/English counterpoints to probably refer to the scruffy human underdogs, represented by the English lyrics, fighting back against the alien oppressors–represented by the Latin lyrics.

But since the designers conveniently ignore the meaning of a few inconvenient lyrics in the Latin, I guess I’m allowed to do the same thing for their English lyrics, hm? :mrgreen: (I wouldn’t intentionally treat the scriptures this way, but a climactic action song to a non-Christian anime based on a Latin Mass isn’t scripture. So there. :stuck_out_tongue: )

So I’ve made a slightly abbreviated version of the combined song, which edits out the egotism of the rapper. I’ll email a version to anyone who posts asking for it (it’s in mp3 format).

Here’s a YouTube of the full version, not the best quality, but set to someone’s run using the song for the game Audiosurf. (You can search around for versions featuring screenshots or clips from the TV show if you prefer; people often set clips from other shows to it, too, such as Bleach and One Piece.) My mp3 is much better sound quality, btw. I tried uploading the modified version, but the forum software doesn’t accept .wav or .mp3 files yet (or anything else like that.)

I’ll provide the lyrics and some comments on them in the next posts for this thread, so as not to make one humongous entry. :wink:


Prayers and Promises and UR
#2

The operetta Kashara Yuri is singing the Latin Libera Me Mass. (The Japanglish rap lyrics are by the group “Tarantula”.)

There’s kind of an unspoken rule in the film industry that Latin (or Greek or Russian) Christian lyrics should be sung as indistinctly as possible; which doesn’t get any better when the singer doesn’t speak English or some other heavily Romanized language as her native tongue. :wink: So the lyrics in this case are REAAALLLLY indistinct. (Especially in the middle when talking about the wisdom of justice coming to judge the lower world in fire.) But I’ll present them below, Latin (with translation) and English both, as close to their relative order of occurrence as possible.

You may notice I’ve left out some English lyrics, just as I said I would in the previous post, because frankly they’re rather pitiful and don’t fit the song very well. I’ll report them later for sake of completeness. I’ve included a few brief descriptions of what’s happening in the music, too, to help keep track of where things are in the song.

Where Latin and English overlap, I’ll usually only provide English-for-Latin (since by then the phrases are repeating something from earlier anyway.) To help connote the overlap of phrases, I have tried to put them off to one side in the middle of “paragraphs” of English lyrics.

Latin-to-English will be in single fancy brackets {like this}; the actual Latin being sung will be in square brackets [like this]. Brief comments from me shall be in normal parentheses (like this). Non-bracketed English is from the rap lyrics.

{Peace eonian} [Requiem aeternam.]
{Grant this to them, Lord…} [Dona eis, Domine…]

Do the impossible
see the invisible
row! row!
fight the power!

touch the untoucheable
break the unbreakable
row! row!
fight the power!

Power to the peeps! Power for the dream,
still missing piece scattering, so incomplete…
“We be the most incredible soldier from underground!”
See how easy, they all fall down!
Digging to the core to see the light;
let’s get out of here babe, that’s the way to survive, ya!
Do the impossible! Don’t you wanna bet?
“'cause a lot of things changed; we be waiting in vain.”
If you wanna get by, no pain no gain!
Wow! fakers wanna test me again!
Get ready to rumble, now is the time, uh huh;
if you ain’t know, now you know!

Good luck fellows…

{Deliver me, O Lord} [Libera me, Domine]
{from the death eonian} [de morte aeterna]
{on that day of trembling} [in die illa tremenda]
{on that day!} [in die illa!]
{When the spheres (the lower heavens) shall be moved and earth} [Quando coeli movendi sunt terra]
{Upon us Wisdom judges the lower world by fire!} [Dum veneris judicare saeculum per ignem]
{I myself am made to tremble and to fear!} [Tremens factus sum ego et timeo]
{Upon us rational wisdom comes in wrath!} [Dum discussio venerit atque ventura ira.]

<piano motif; 2nd English lyrics omitted>

{On that day} [Dies illa]
{that day of wrath} [dies irae]
{calamity} [calamitatis]
{and misery!} [et miseriae]

Do the impossible
see the invisible {On that day!!}
row! row!
fight the power!

touch the untoucheable
break the unbreakable {that day of greatness!!} [dies magna]
row! row!
fight the power!

what you gonna do is, what you wanna do is just
break the rule, then you’ll see the truth, uh-huh {and bitterness most sweet} [et amara valde]

this is the theme of the “G” coming through baby! {and bitterness most sweet!!!}
row! row!
fight the power!

FIGHT THE POWER!!!

{Peace}
Do the impossible
see the invisible
row! row!
fight the power!
{eonian}
touch the untoucheable
break the unbreakable
row! row!
fight the power! (rowing continues in background off and on afterward {g})

{grant them this}
what you gonna do is, what you wanna do is just
break the rule, then you’ll see the truth, uh-huh
{O Lord!}
this is the theme of the “G” coming through baby!
row! row!
fight the power!

[Requiem]
Do the impossible
see the invisible
row! row!
fight the power!
[aeternam]
touch the untoucheable
break the unbreakable
row! row!
fight the power!
{grant to them}
what you gonna do is, what you wanna do is just
break the rule, then you’ll see the truth, uh-huh
{this peace!}
this is the theme of the “G” coming through baby!
row! row!
fight the power!

{and perpetual light} [et lux perpetua]
what you gonna do is, what you wanna do is just
break the rule, then you see the truth, uh-huh
{shine to them!} [luceat eis]
this is the theme of the “G” coming through baby!
row! row!
fight the power!

[Libera me…]
Do the impossible
see the invisible
row! row!
fight the power!
[DOMINE!!!]

row! row!
fight the power!
row! row!
fight the power!
row! row!
fight the power!
row! row!
fight the power!
row! row!
fight the power!
row! row!
fight the power!
[Libera me, Domine…]
row! row!
fight the power!
row! row!
fight the power!
row! row!
fight the power!
row! row!
fight the power!

•••••••••••• [end lyrics]


#3

Before I continue, I suppose I ought to print the English lyrics I excised. So here they are, in their own little post… :wink:

••••••••
top of the head, I’m on the set
••••••••

That’s a brief line in the middle of the first verse; it goes right before “Do the impossible! Do you wanna bet?”, and is standard rapper bragging.

••••••••
sorry, my rhyme’s gonna snatch your brain, yo
I’m still starving for the straight up [bleep]
we gonna make it happen with the crazy rap skill
••••••••

That’s from near the end of the first verse; it goes between “fakers wanna test me again” and “get ready to rumble”, and as you can see it’s pretty standard rap boasting. :unamused: I bleeped out the also-pretty-standard scatological slang.

I was lucky that, while its omission throws the music off, the result still ends up a proper 4-time beat by the end (because of that other stanza above that I deleted).

Here’s the whole second verse, which I omitted entirely.

•••••••
2nd verse dedicates to the real peeps
what we got to say is so real thing
cuz, revolution ain’t never gonna televise
kicking the mad flow, microphone phenotype
open your third eye, seeing through the overground
I’m about to hit you with the scream from the underground
whole city is covered with the cyber flavor
“G” is in your area, one of the toughest enigma
••••••••

Doesn’t really add much, picks up a few ideas from the series (and the first set of verses), but only puts them in the service of typical rap blathering.

Hopefully no one will be offended that I removed these examples of Tarantula’s “crazy rap skill” meant to “snatch our brain” with their supreme competence… :laughing: You can still hear them in the link I provided, of course (as well as most other YouTube presentations of the song.)

The one line I wish I could have kept is the final one. “G” is in your area, one of the toughest enigmas, indeed! :smiley:


#4

Right then! On with commentary for why I like this song so much (despite obvious problems with it, some of which I’ve simply excised for personal taste and to make things flow better.)

The Latin is from the “Libera Me” Mass sung during Roman Catholic funeral services. I originally expected it to be one of the Psalms sung in rotation by monastic houses; but even though it isn’t a direct transcription of some portion of scripture, the phrases and ideas are obviously picked up from across the OT and NT where thematically appropriate. The real Libera Me differs from this mainly by not repeating some of the phrases. This Mass has been set to music several times over the centuries; I haven’t been able to track down whether the version used here was directly borrowed from someone else, but it has some similarity to Verdi’s incorporation of it in his epic “Dies Irae”.

“Requiem” can mean sleep, rest or death. In the context here, it has to mean rest, since the people in question (including in the original purpose of the Mass) have already died! The rest, consequently, is salvation after death (in one or another way) from agitation (in one or another way), into communion with God. So by analogy it primarily means the granting of peace. (In the anime it means something sinister instead, keeping buried people peacefully underground…!)

The Lord is Who is being asked by the singer to grant peace, to “them”.

In the “official” “Engrish” :wink: transcription of the lyrics, what’s being said is “Raw! Raw!” This doesn’t make much sense, though, either in regard to the face-value meaning of the lyrics, nor to the anime’s storyline. It doesn’t sound like English “raw” either!–it sounds like English “row”, which makes a little more sense. Rowing implies pulling oars to move something, and that’s how most listeners take the lyrics: rowing against some power. (Which also fits the anime story, btw.)

“Rowing” has a special Christian sense, however, which few people know about! When Luke (in his prologue to GosLuke for example) and Paul (in 1 Cor 4, for example) talk about people being authoritative deputies of Christ, they use a Greek term “under-rowers”! This is borrowed from ancient naval terminology, of course (and rather nicely fits the apparent claim of Luke to quietly have been part of Paul’s epic naval wreck in Acts!) Even the officers of Christ in the Church are only under-rowers compared to Christ, our Captain, helping move the Church along. And as we know from several other things that are said (including the parallel metaphor about yokes and unequal oxen), our Captain is in fact the one doing the primary “rowing”! Nevertheless, we’re expected to join Him in the rowing, as good followers. Rowing for what purpose? Ah! :smiley:

Well, in the NT the purpose is for evangelism. And in the Gospels (especially the Synoptics) this involves, among other things, reaching out to the least among us to lift them up. Throughout Christian history, even opponents to Christianity have had to grudgingly admit that Christian evangelists have been instrumental in “seeing the invisible” and “touching the untouchable” (a concept especially found in India). This has huge relevance to the judgment of the sheep/flock and the baby-goats, too!–the sheep, even though they were surprised to learn they had been serving Christ, had been doing just those things. The baby-goats had not; and were judged to have been not really following Christ (which surprised them in turn!)

Christ (and Paul and Peter in their own ways afterward) tells us that this evangelism also involves the harrowing of hell, in some way. That way, and extent, is debated, of course. :wink: But (especially in the Synoptics) it involves not only breaking the power of “powers and principalities” (as Paul likes to put it), and yanking them back into order behind Christ (in whatever way that might mean–which obviously we universalists have some thoughts about :mrgreen:) but also freeing people imprisoned there.

And it isn’t only freeing people under the tyranny and oppression of Satan (tying up the Plunder-possessor in order to possess his plunder, as Christ colorfully puts it!) It’s also about announcing pardon for sins to people who have been punished by God; the promised time of their release has come!–but they do have to repent of their sins and accept God’s forgiveness. Not only salvation from the other things they (naturally and properly) want to be saved from. This is a major theme behind Christ’s first announcement of the gospel in Nazareth, when He quotes from Isaiah: those people being freed from imprisonment were Israel herself imprisoned by God for her adulterous idolatries and her refusal to do justice to those in need!

So then:

“Do the impossible” – “Then who can be saved?!” “With men this is impossible, but with God all things are possible!”

“See the invisible” – Regard those whom other people turn away from in scorn; including those consigned to “the unseen”, i.e. “hades”! Also, Christ Himself is the image of the unseeable God, and a time will come when all people, including those in the depths, will and must see Him!

“Row! Row! Fight the power!” – As under-rowers to Christ, we work along with Him in the eonian evangel; and as we are promised “the gates of hades will not stand strong against you”! As Christ descends into hades to preach the gospel to those in bondage and bring them out, so are we expected to join the Holy Spirit in doing so, as at the end of RevJohn. Christ Himself rejoices, seeing the “prince of the world” being overthrown and falling down like lightning, at the first sending of His under-rowers! :smiley:

“Touch the untouchable” – As Christ Himself touched the lepers in order to heal them; and heals those He has struck down so far that they are “neither slave nor free” anymore but a by-word of disdain.

“Break the unbreakable” – Again, breaking the bonds of those tyrannized by the chief of sinners; breaking down the gates of Satan’s domain; and breaking the pride of evil-doers; running them down like a king over-running an army in order to bring it back under his dominion. Which, so far as the Hebrew goes, is what we are even supposed to be praying to God to do to us in the famous Shepherd’s Psalm!

“Row! Row! Fight the power!” – We don’t fight against love, but against “powers and principalities”: the unloving exercise of mere power, which is trying to compete against love–the true foundational power of all reality, including the power being abused by the tyrants–and is so destined to fail!

More comments to come…


#5

Moving onto the main English lyrics:

“Power to the peeps!” – That’s rap slang for ‘people’, of course; and those people who are saved are called to be kings (and queens) as well as priests under God, as all Christians agree, whether Calv, Arm or Kath.

“Power for the dream, still missing piece scattering, so incomplete…” – The ellipsis is my punctuation addition, and in this case doesn’t mean there are lyrics I’m ellipsing past. :wink: I added them to help the narrative flow for a reason I’ll get to next. In the anime, this has to do with humanity surviving in pockets underground around the Earth, and how there can’t be victory until everyone is brought out to be a human family again. That includes the “beastmen” who live on the surface, too, by the way!–working for the oppressive overlords! But in Christian parlance, this would refer to being given power to bring together all people in brotherhood under God. The New Testament is particularly emphatic about how the dream of peace in the Day of the Lord to come cannot and will not be realized until everyone is brought into the fold. So long as even the 100th sheep is scattered, the flock is incomplete.

“‘We be the most incredible soldier from underground!’” – This statement applies to the heroes in the anime. In Christian parlance, though, this would be a statement made by those warring against God, boasting in their perceived superiority; so I’m treating the English as switching speaking characters briefly here. (As the Latin lyrics certainly do at times. More on that later.) OT and NT apocalyptic imagery prophesies that in the final battle, or battles, the enemies of God will be released from their prison, pictured as being under the ground or under the waters, to afflict those living on the Earth.

“See how easy, they all fall down!” – Applied to the heroes from underground beating the overground villains in the anime. In Judeo-Christian apocalyptic, though, while the enemies of God from “underground/underwater” may give the natural world a devastatingly difficult time, they will prove no match for Christ and the heavenly armies at the end, including the risen saints of the Church, but will be easily trod down and scattered to pieces.

“Digging to the core to see the light” – This verse actually makes no sense to the anime, since the whole thematic point there, repeatedly stressed, is to keep going up and up. In Christian parlance, though, it makes a lot of sense!–and in more than one way. In each sinner God has to pulverize the stubborn stony heart, in order to reach the God-breathed soul inside and save her from sin; similarly, the Church with Christ as her Leader crushes down the gates of hades that attempt to “stand down-strong against them” (as the Greek colorfully puts it in describing the tyranny of hell, pressing down on its victims), in order to bring “light to those who sit in darkness”–something that happens in the living world, too.

“Let’s get out of here, babe, that’s the way to survive, ya!” – In the anime, of course, the humans are trying to escape from their unjust imprisonment underground. But in Christian parlance, living in sin is no way to live, and apart from the grace of God leads only to death–whether that’s in this life or after natural death. Bringing people out of hades into the light of God’s eternal life is the only way for them to survive. Even if Christ, on the cross, has to “drag all men” to Himself. :wink:

“Do the impossible! Don’t you wanna bet?” – There’s some debate over whether the lyric here isn’t “Got you on a bet” instead; I’ve seen respected sites go either way, and listening closely I think it sounds more like this than the other. But I’d go with this anyway. :smiley: As I often say when debating with Arminians, IT DOSEN’T TAKE MUCH FAITH TO BET ON GOD!! :mrgreen: Even to do what Arms think is impossible, “For with men this is impossible, but with God all things are possible”, in answer to the question “Then who can be saved?” Calvs, at least, understand this. This lyric makes more sense with the anime storyline, too, which constantly says bet on the impossible for the sake of hope. (The alternate guess as to the lyric would be just standard rap boasting.)

“’‘cause a lot of things change; we be waiting in vain.’” – Even in the rap’s original intention this would be a character switch (which is why I put it in quote marks); the people he’s addressing don’t want to bet because they’ve been waiting so long with no hope and lots of things change: the situation might be worse, they’ve gotten comfortable and weaker, etc. The Christian application is obvious here: why hope for salvation? Maybe God has changed His mind and doesn’t want to save us anymore. Things have been bad a long time, we see no reason from past experience to believe that tomorrow will be any better. This is EXACTLY the complaint made by Israel after being punished by God in the OT, when coming salvation from their imprisonment is prophesied to them. It is, in fact, the retort that God in turn rebukes with the classic lines about the pot answering back to the potter and “Who are you to answer back to God?” Calvs–and Arms too ultimately–take this to mean Saint Paul is answering for God in Romans 9 against hope of salvation and mercy, but that’s entirely opposite to the original context!

“If you wanna get by, no pain no gain!” – And that’s a pretty standard answer from God, too. Repentance isn’t fun; the discipline of chastening isn’t fun. It has to be done to live, though! And God doesn’t decree this from on high against us, but hangs in there with us. :smiley: As the T-Shirt says, “God’s Gym! His pain; our gain!”

“Wow! fakers wanna test me again!” – I could have gone with this being a reply from the people needing salvation, despairing that those bringing the gospel are fakers. But the English lyrics are pretty consistent about first-person statements being that of the main speaker. In the rap, this leads into a typical round of boasting by the competent (!?! :laughing: ) rapper and his opponents who are incompetent fakers. I needed another line to make the timing come out right, though, so I decided to keep it, since it could be considered preparation by the Church speaker to meet in battle with the “fakers” holding power in hades. Leading in nicely to the next line…

“Get ready to rumble, now is the time, uh-huh; if you ain’t know, now you know!” – …which is self-explanatory enough. But is also important because the song is about to shift into wrath-of-God butt-kicking of the unrighteous. :mrgreen: The “eonian gospel” announced by the angel in RevJohn is nothing less or other than the “eonian gospel”, but regardless of how things end the immediate result is the kind of thing the Latin singer is about to sing of.

“Good luck fellows…” – Yeah, they’re going to need it. :mrgreen: But it won’t be enough. This could also be applied the other way around, of course: the Church goes forth against the gates of hell, behind Christ Pantokrator, All-Powerful Lord of Hosts, and so has God’s luck on our side!

Comments on the shift back to the Latin part of the song next…


#6

Switching to comments on the Latin core in the middle of the song:

Remember, the Latin singer started off praying for God’s peace on “them”.

The shift now to “Deliver me O Lord from the death eonian” happens in the real Libera Me Mass, too; the singer switches character from the one who is saved, pouring peace, to the one needing salvation and peace (and stays in this character for most of her side of the song. But she’ll switch back at the end.) This is a common psalmatic feature, by the way: the Biblical Psalms and prophetic songs often do the same thing, switching back and forth between “speaking characters” without always being entirely clear about who is supposed to be talking at a particular time. Which leads to many headaches in trying to exegete them. :wink:

“on that day of trembling, on that day” – this is the first mention in the Libera Me of the Day of the Lord to come, a time of fear and trembling for those not yet saved. (Maybe for those of us who are saved and still at ground-level, too!)

“When the spheres and the earth shall be moved” – the lower heavens shake, as well as the earth and the lower parts of the earth, with the arrival of the Lord. Rebel powers in all three areas (poetically speaking) will be pummeled, and the spirits of the power of the air will be shot down.

“Upon us Wisdom judges the lower world by fire!” – there’s the third typical area in the “full extent trilogy” often found in the Bible when an author wants to talk about the total extent of God’s Something. :slight_smile: It isn’t only the “lower world” that gets judged in flaming fire from the presence of God, of course, but the singer notably puts herself in that place. That’s the humble thing to do, as each of us must be prepared to consider ourselves as the chief of sinners.

“I myself am made to tremble and to fear!” – I like the personal emphasis of the singer here.

“Upon us rational wisdom comes in wrath!” – It isn’t only power striking us down as sinners. Someone might still consider themselves superior to mere power in their own wisdom. But Wisdom Himself, against which we cannot justify ourselves, condemns our sin! We have no defense!

Of course, while mere power would be tyranny, even a tyrant could happen to be factually or even (in some legal sense) morally correct in pulverizing other sinners. But if God is essentially love (see some other threads here for discussion on that, pro or con :mrgreen: ) then we have nowhere to stand at all. If Love Himself judges against our sin, in and as Love, “waging war in fair-togetherness” as Rev 19 puts it, then we have not even that appeal to try to justify our behavior. We must in fact be ethically wrong, and God must be right. Our overthrow isn’t by mere omnipotence or even omniscience. We are thrown down by the One Who could not possibly be a tyrant. We might be right (if foolish!) to rebel against One Who is not love; we cannot be right to rebel against Love Himself, He Who gives Himself in Love for our sakes.

Indeed, then: a “day of wrath, calamity and misery” for those who rebel against Love foundational–for we all have sinned against Love, we all have abused the grace of Love. And Love in His wrath finally comes to pulverize us.

A day of wrath; but also “dies magna” a day of greatness, “et amara valde” and bitterness most sweet.

Wait… what? Isn’t Christ Pantokrator coming to scatter rebels with the rod of iron and feed them to the birds of the air? What could be sweet about that bitterness?!

Because, even in RevJohn 19, Christ comes to shepherd His worst enemies with the rod. Just as we are supposed to pray for our own sakes in the Shepherd’s Psalm.

Nicely, the English refrain kicks back in here, while the Latin soprano is singing about that day of greatness and of bitterness most sweet. What is the point of those who are “fighting the power”? (See comments on the shorter version of the refrain above. :smiley: ) I also like how the music in both parts of the ‘judgment doom’ ramps up to climactic positive hope!

It’s interesting that Catholics got into the habit of singing this song for funeral services, because strictly speaking from the standpoint of Roman Catholic soteriology it doesn’t make much sense. Or from the standpoint of most Christian soteriologies for that matter! :mrgreen: The dead guy is dead, his fate is already sealed–isn’t it!!!

Sure, if he was a good Catholic he should be in Catholic purgatory. But that isn’t supposed to have anything to do with people still needing eschatological salvation!–which is clearly what the song is talking about. It seems like this ancient church psalm may have meant something crucially different back when the Church started using it for funerals. (“Kaths”, distinct from “Caths”, would have some guesses about that original usage. :mrgreen: )

Comments on the climax next…


#7

Climactic comments for the grand finale! :smiley:

So, as noted toward the end of my last comment on this arrangement, the music, though straining in some odd chords, actually ramps up in hopeful rising during the toughest statements about the judgment coming by God on the Day of the Lord.

By the time the Latin singer begins declaring, rather unexpectedly, about that “day of greatness” also being that day of “bitterness most sweet” (the meaning could also be “intense”, to be fair, but often carries the connotations of sweetness; compare to where we get the word “almond” from by contrast!), the English lyrics are back. And, leaving aside what their meaning would be in context of the anime (which isn’t this rich), in Christian context those lyrics would be about evangelizing and saving the wretches that other people would think of themselves as being too good to bother with!

When Christ and His under-rowers (that’s us, the Church who have been called to meet Him in the air, from the heavens or from the earth or from our sleep in the graves) arrive for the final fight against the power of hell, the eonian gospel still goes on: the point is still to see the invisible and to touch the untouchable, as well as to break the unbreakable–to do the impossible that only God our Savior can do!!

“what you gonna do is, what you wanna do is just / break the rule, then you’ll see the truth, uh-huh” – in terms of the anime story, this simply means breaking free of the tyrannical alien overlords (who by the way are well-intentioned extremists trying to protect the whole universe from being destroyed by those underground–but also hogging all the power for themselves). But Christians are called to join with Christ in breaking the rule of the powers and principalities who keep people enslaved in sin.

And the truth is not only that Christ is Lord of all, as all will someday confess (a term of loyalty and praise for God’s mighty saving acts); but ALSO that all will someday confess that Christ is Lord!! The bitterness of the Day of the Lord to come is most sweet after all!

By accident or not, this is how the song climaxes: as the woman sings of the revelation of the bitterness being most sweet, the man is singing in English “this is the theme of the ‘G’ coming through, baby!”

ROW! ROW! FIGHT THE POWER!!

and by this point I’m usually crying, no matter how many times I hear it… :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: Thank God, the eonian gospel shines through in the most unexpected ways!!!

(I’ll mention here that there doesn’t seem to be an official explanation anywhere for what the lyricist means by “the theme of the ‘G’ coming through”. People have guessed that “G” means “gangster”, and that would sort of fit the braggart rap portions, in a way, though even there he doesn’t make gangster claims per se. I don’t recall this being a “theme” of the anime series either. This is why I wished I could have found a way to keep the final stanza of the second verse: it’s a tough enigma indeed! Maybe the connections here aren’t so accidental after all… Updated to add: on further thought, the lyric was probably intended to refer to “Gurren”, which is the name of the drill used by the hero; and a big theme of the series, mentioned in many episodes, is “Yours/Mine is the drill that will pierce the heavens”. So, eh. The Christian interpretation that actually synchs with the Libera Me is still better. :slight_smile: )

From here out the song powers on through the triumphant climax; while the English lyrics continue the (evangelical, in Christian terms!) refrain, the Latin singer returns to the ‘voice’ of the original ‘character’, praying for eonian peace; grant them this O Lord! And shine upon them perpetual light!!

On who? Not on the people already saved in the Day of the Lord to come, but on the sinners not yet saved! The victory of God must be complete to the utter extreme! Keep on rowing and never give up!–for we ourselves were saved by the persistence of God!

As I am corporate in Adam, all of humanity, I myself cannot be saved until all have been liberated! The final sheep must be found and brought home!

[size=200]Libera Me, Domine!!! MARAN ATHA!!![/size]